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Can CBD benefit your hair and scalp?

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People prefer using cannabis for its medical benefits. It’s also a natural way of treating many diseases without any side effects. Different cannabinoids in cannabis have been used for thousands of years for therapeutic purposes. Most commonly for treating chronic or psychological pain. The recent researches have also shown that we can use CBD in the development of thick and strong hair, so CBD can benefit your hair.

Experts say that CBD can be the main ingredient in shampoos to maintaining healthier and strong hair. As many shampoos and other hair products contain CBD. But still, a lot of research is needed for a better understanding of the benefits of CBD in this field.

CBD and hair

A lot of properties of CBD can help in the growth of strong and healthy hair.Researchers recommend using CBD oil as a starter for hair treatment. CBD oil is clinically proven for its medical benefits. It can improve the strength of human hair. Because it is rich in fatty acids, amino acids, and antioxidants.

Proteins are very important for the strength of hair. Amino acids present in the CBD are the main building blocks of proteins. The proteins in CBD can protect the hair follicles and strengthen them. Moreover, CBD can also moisturise the hair. Especially protecting the hair from drying out. Its a total lifesaver in winter when the hair strands dry out. Most of the women also face the problem of hair damage and hair breaks. CBD oil can prevent these problems by diminishing friction.

The antioxidants in CBD such as vitamins E, C, and A are also very advantageous for hair strength and growth. Moreover, CBD oil contains minerals such as potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium and other fatty acids like omega-9, omega-6, and omega-3. All these components of CBD oil promote hair growth and make it better than any other oil of hair-care.

Psoriasis and dermatitis, conditions of skin and scalp, can also be treated by CBD oil. An investigation also found that CBD oil can treat a wide range of skin conditions. Experts believe that it also has the potential to treat a similar type of scalp conditions.

Is CBD efficient for hair loss?

Still, a lot of investigations are going on to find the efficiency of CBD oil for hair loss. Researchers believe that CBD oil can help in preventing hair loss as it contains vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, and amino acids. CBD can also work as a moisturising agent for the scalp in case of hair loss.

It also plays a vital role in managing the scalp’s production of sebum due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Experts say that CBD can only help with some types of hair loss. In case of severe hair loss, you need to concern your doctor and undergo therapy.

Doctors consider CBD because it does not has any side-effects and is a natural way of treatment. Moreover, it can cure damaged cells. So it may help with balding.

Experts recommend that before trying CBD oil for your hair or scalp you need to concern the specialist first. Because oils can be sensitive to the scalp. So the doctor will recommend you after diagnosing you.

 

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Cannabis

Scientists Use Computer Intelligence In Cannabis Research

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computers and researchers disprove scientific myths about cannabis

Just twenty years ago, computers couldn’t store more than a hundred characters on screen before running out of memory. We’ve made untold progress in tech since then, and every field stands to benefit. Where once scientists would struggle to plot everything out by hand, computers breeze through the data in seconds. And from time to time, we end up being the ones learning from our own creations.

A study out of the University of Colorado has led to shock from the international community when it poked holes in our knowledge. This happens all the time in science, though – Stephen Hawking spent a large part of his career correcting himself. But this incident stands out because advanced computer software was the one to burst our bubble this time. And boy, did it leave everyone stunned.

Cannabinoids are difficult to study

Let’s back up for a second. We spend a lot of time here advocating for cannabis usage, and that isn’t changing. However, we also advocate for scientific advancement, and that is why these findings are so relevant. To be clear, a lot of what we know about the effects of cannabis is still true. What has changed is the way we understand complex relationships between the myriad of chemicals in cannabis and how they lead to the experience we all love. And we have computer based learning to thank for that.

So let’s get right into it. For starters, ‘cannabis’ or the two widely known species of the plant, contains hundreds of different chemicals inside the leaves. Some of these, the ones that contribute to the high like THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol) are well known. But aside from these, there are numerous other chemicals whose effects we aren’t really sure about. And even excluding those, these chemicals can react in such a way to produce even more chemicals after the fact. So it clearly is not easy to simply make a chart of the different chemicals and their effects. That’s why our conventional, experiment based methods won’t work, and why we need computer learning.

How computers are changing the field

Previously, scientists assumed that THC and CBD were different products of the same precursor chemical, Cannabigerolic acid (CBGA). Scientists assumed before was under exposure to heat, certain chemical reactions take place that make CBGA turn into either one of the two, via a series of steps. What implies is that if any one between the two chemicals i.e. THC or CBD was high in concentration, the other had to be lower in order to balance out. That makes sense, because there’s a fixed amount of CBGA to start out with, and that has to be the same amount converted into both THC and CBD.

And that’s where these scientists made their mistake. Using computers, researchers divided different species of Cannabis by what their most common usage was, and compared the composition of each. This is a technique called “Dimensionality Grouping” and it sounds a lot easier than it is. For a proper study like this, you need to find the exact chemical makeup of each type of plant across a few hundred specimens to get rid of natural fluctuations in the compositions. Cutting out the jargon, that is a lot of work, but thankfully we have amazing computers that brute-force these problems for us instead.

So what does that all mean for me, the average cannabis user?

Frankly, it means nothing. But this opens up a large variety of uses in medicine, chemical engineering and other fields once we understand how these molecules interact. The applications come later; first comes the hard work. And without computers, we’d still be in the dark about how our favorite chemicals work.

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Major Canadian City Takes First Steps Towards Cannabis Legislation

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cannabis legalization in canada is a success

As the developed world pushes towards more open laws regarding the sale and distribution of cannabis, it’s wonderful to see the tide of public opinion sway the law. It is truly an emboldening sight to see the will of the many override the political agendas of the few. In this case, Ottawa city residents celebrate as recent polls show the majority of citizens are pro-cannabis legalization. Following such developments, the state has decided to investigate the effects of cannabis in the light of science.

This measure is a commendable step towards normalizing recreational drugs and creating a safer and more tolerant society. It’s no secret that cannabis usage is socially disapproved. That doesn’t mean, however, that there is any basis in fact for that negative reputation. Thankfully, Ottawa’s heads of state exist to serve, and aren’t shy of accepting when they’re wrong. Or learning to rethink their viewpoints, either.

Most people agree less regulation, more toleration is the way forward

As seen reflected in recent polls, more than 60 per cent of Ottawa residents are in favor of more broad-minded approaches to the cannabis issue. Riding the wave of acceptance the 2018 federal legalization of cannabis brought throughout Canada, legislators have begun rolling back restrictions. And that is honestly great news. It is a much needed reminder for North America that our democracy is worth fighting for.

Canadian legislators have begun the long work of making cannabis laws more open and tolerant. To this end, Health Canada has decided to take the help of scientists and health experts to inform their decisions. This is a very good approach, because it lessens the influence social factors have upon law forming. And when the science backs up the relative harmlessness of the drug, opinions are sure to change. As the federal healthcare provider, Health Canada has a serious responsibility to be the most well informed about every drug’s potential risks. So it is good to see them taking positive steps to evaluate the risks and outcomes cannabis has, however few they may be.

Canada’s laws on cannabis may need refinement

While it was a shock to the world when cannabis became federally legalized in 2018, it came with some drawbacks too. For one, the shift in public approval was extremely rapid – that meant there wasn’t enough time for proper discourse. People spent most of their time working to make cannabis legal, and not how that legalization should work. As a result, what we have in Canada is a flawed system made with the best of intentions.

Most young users report they have never tried the drug at all, according to the Canadian Center for Drug Use and Addiction. A concerning trend is that those who do try weed for the first time end up getting it from the wrong source: the black market. It is possible that illegal drug dealers might mix in powerful addictive substances just to get people hooked. But with such a large area, and so few retailers, the black market currently has much more reach than legal stores.

The hardest work is done, but there is still a ways to go

The countrywide legalization of cannabis is a powerful message to the world. In the US, we’re still quite far from that happening. The hardest part of the journey is done, but there is still a lot left to do. Canada can’t get away with ‘just average’ drug control: it needs to be the best to pave the way globally. And with steps like the one Ottawa’s government just took, it’s not hard to believe it will.

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How Michigan’s New Cannabis Social Equity Reforms Work

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Black & Brown Cannabis Guild compensates convicts

Cannabis regulations, when done right, can pave the way for an equal and prosperous society. Unfortunately, much of history, especially in the United States of America, reflects the opposite. The nation’s long standing so-called ‘War On Drugs‘ still leaves lasting scars on entire communities. That’s why when it comes to racial justice and activism, expungement of cannabis-related charges can bring a lot of good. And especially since studies show black and non-white minorities faced tremendously greater risk of arrest then white cannabis users. Enter the Black & Brown Cannabis Guild.

In Michigan, a state where recreational and medicinal marijuana received legal status in 2018, wrongs need righting. Over the past several decades, countless convictions subjected the innocent. And the punishments, disproportionately severe in relation to the offence, certainly didn’t fit the crime. Simple possession of cannabis could lead to misdemeanor charges, while usage often led to jail time. All of these criminal prosecutions led to permanent stains on records, leading to further marginalization for many.

The Black And Brown Cannabis Guild (BBCG) seeks to secure recompense for racial persecutions

Once Michigan legalized cannabis usage, the obvious question arose. What about those currently serving sentences over cannabis charges, and those with permanent strikes? After all, the countless African American, Latino and other people of color being punished should no longer face criminal records. That’s like prosecuting homosexual relationships, years after the practice got decriminalized. It certainly seemed like amnesty and a clean slate were sorely due.

Recently, the state of Vermont signed off on proposed bills that would try to improve social equity. The two main ways the bill seeks to do this included increased funding for small retailers and expungement. The former seeks to help out minority owners of cannabis stores get up on their feet and compete with bigger, more-privileged chains. And the latter measure would not only immediately release convicts but also wipe the slate clean for all with cannabis charges. Only with this, the bill says, will marginalized communities gain the tools to overcome decades of racism and prejudice.

The War On Drugs left many minority communities persecuted, and expungement is the only moral compensation

The United States at some point decided that drugs of any kind needed brutality to get rid of, at any cost. As a result, police raids, widespread arrests, convictions and wiretaps became all too common since the 1970s. The Nixon-era policy sought to curb increasing illegal drug use, despite not targeting the root causes behind drug usage. This means that instead of combatting poverty, addiction, gang influences and corruption the program simply punished the poor users. The BBCG therefore wants to assist the people of color, and anyone else, wrongfully persecuted.

People with cannabis charges on their permanent record simply face too much oppression. Even outside of jail, they bear reduced likelihoods of employment opportunities, security checks, prejudice and stigma. They carry the label the police wrongfully stuck to them. It doesn’t matter if the arrest was over a simple weed joint or crystal methamphetamine, the stigma remains the same. Furthermore, entire minority communities of former convicts often face discrimination.

The move comes as long overdue, but it is still a step in the right direction

Nothing the government does can magically erase decades of oppression. And it also cannot cure racism, bigotry or discrimination overnight. However, by issuing due apologies, absolving the convicted of charges and funding minority communities, something positive is carried out. These steps hopefully will go a long way for many marginalized groups, as the BBCG hopes.

We can only hope other states catch onto this much-needed policy. For the latest, stay tuned!

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