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Why The Second Trump vs Biden Debate May Be Unlikely To Happen

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second debate may be cancelled

Donald Trump, best known as the current president of the United States of America, always came off as ignorant. From wild allegations against former president Barack Obama, claiming he is a foreigner, to rampant cases of misogyny. From refusing to condemn white supremacists, to allowing the disastrous coronavirus to ravage the nation unchecked. In short, the man is a perfect example of obscene wealth without the intellect to back it up, as the debate proved.

To be fair, Trump was already oafish and morally bankrupt back when he was simply a television celebrity and mogul. The most devastating of his direct effects only became apparent after his ascension to politics. However, with the upcoming elections in November set out to potentially upset his incumbency with Democratic nominee Joe Biden. Thus, to maintain his support base, he recently doubled down on his stances.

Also Read: Decriminalization of Marijuana Likely Under Joe Biden’s Administration

The irony of Trump catching COVID-19 after months of downplaying its seriousness seems lost on him

Unfortunately, one of the biggest trends in the United States seems extremely harmful if left unchecked. This policy is the opposition and blatant disregard for the advice given by established science experts. And furthermore, this is best exemplified by most of the GOP’s aversion to accepting the very real ongoing climate crisis. With respect to the coronavirus pandemic, which claimed over 213000 lives in the nation so far, things appear as similar. At the behest of the Trump Administration, schools, government offices, and public spaces were opened prematurely.

Now that Trump himself contracted the disease, it seems hard to think of anything except how overdue it was. The man publicly derided experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci and even mocked the concept of face masks. Now, in the wake of an embarrassing defeat at the first presidential debate in September, a sensible man would lay low. However, in his typical fashion, he seems conflicted at the prospects of a second round.

A second presidential debate would follow custom, but given both Trump’s infection, may end up breaking tradition

In a typical election cycle, the general (but not compulsory) rule is that the two leading candidates must square off in a series of debates. This platform allows candidates to succinctly recap their intended policies going forward. The additional banter and criticism of each other are intended to allow on-the-fence voters to decide who to support. The system is certainly far from perfect but largely followed every election year. However, this year, Donald Trump seems to have offset the order of things. His diagnosis means that the safest mode of the debate would fall to a digital, online platform.

However, the man misled both fans and critics alike with his statements. While previously dismissing the need for a second debate as useless, he later seemed to change his mind. Recent quotes from him have him boasting about his alleged perfect state of health. And against the advice of experts, he now expresses his desire to continue the debate series, in person. This is a serious breach of WHO guidelines for infected people, especially in a pre-vaccine world.

What actually happens depends largely on Biden’s campaign strategy and Trump’s next decision

While Biden has the right to decline a debate, it may prove unwise so close to election day. His chosen vice president, Kamala Harris, recently took to debate with incumbent vice president Mike Pence. The debate swung in her favor, due to her steady, reasonable manner of speaking and clear-cut points. However, amusingly, the real star of the show turned out a fly that sat on an unaware Pence’s head. This sparked countless online memes and jokes, and some pointing out how otherwise the debates seemed superfluous.

 

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Five States to decide their Cannabis Future this November

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cannabis future of the states

New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, South Dakota and Mississippi are going to decide on cannabis legalization. The picture of their cannabis future is going to be pretty clear after the 3rd of November.

The sale of medical cannabis legalized in the US 8 years ago. Ever since then, the cannabis industry is leading the market. The rough guess on marijuana monopoly in 2019 is from 10-13$ billion.

Now, the US is moving towards a new step, legalizing possession and growth of cannabis by adults. This is a long shot, however, if applied it could boost the economy.

Cannabis plays a major role in the country’s economy and many big companies like Curaleaf are producing great revenue through this industry.

This approach is helping in increasing economic balance. However, legalizing cannabis only on an official level and applying loads of regulations on the products is not proving much helpful for the general public.

Also Read: Medicinal Cannabis Costs are Back Breaking- MPs raised Voices

Strict regulations with bad results

With these regulations imposed, it becomes difficult for a layman to have easy access. Most patients in need cannot get medical marijuana either because of legal restrictions or financial.

To regulate the use of medical cannabis, the government increased the rates of the product with high imposed taxes. They want to make sure that a certain amount of the product only reaches per person. But this is doing worse than good.

People and people’s representatives understand this. The only viable visible solution is legalizing growth and possession of cannabis. Regulations and restrictions will be applied to them too, but people will at least have access.

In the US, many states took it upon themselves to solve this issue. We’re here to discuss five of them. Each state has its own agenda on their cannabis future and their goals shape according to that.

 

New Jersey

Phil Murphy, the governor is of the opinion that cannabis should be legalized for adult use. He says that criminalization only serves to full courts and jeopardize futures.

The governor has tried a lot to legalize the drug through congress progressions but failed to do so. His only hope is the public forum. If the public decides for itself, they can achieve the goal.

The public forum results are very likely to be in favour. A recent university poll suggests 61% of the population is likely to vote in favour.

 

 

Arizona

The future of Arizona, however, is not very certain. The public agenda seems to be fluctuating from time to time. The poll to legalize in 2002 was rejected by 58% of the people.

An alternate poll won by 50.13% of the votes. After that, there was a forum to establish an adult-use market in 2015 and it also got rejected by 52% of the voters.

This year’s poll is likely to be in favour, but one can never be sure as there are almost equal amounts of opposite views.

 

Montana

In Montanan, the conditions are a bit different. There are two forums, one for whether adult-use cannabis should be legalized. The second one asks the age for which legalization should take place.

This sort of referendum is likely to lead some people into confusion.

    Also Read: Economists Discuss the Fiscal Outcomes of Cannabis Legalization

 

South Dakota

South Dakota is one of the few states with no form of legalization of cannabis. In there, the fight is for both medical use and adult-use legalization. They will have to prioritize of course and medical use should be the first priority.

 

Mississippi

The voters in Mississippi are in a confused state. They are all up for cannabis legalization, but the details are not that simple.

There are two initiatives, 65 that supports legalization by a campaign and 65A that supports government control. Professionals are supporting 65A, however, results are not certain.

 

Cannabis future is bright and this industry has great prospects, let us sit back and witness this revolution so that we have a great story to tell!

 

 

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Cannabis

How The Upcoming US Elections Could Benefit The Marijuana Industry

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candidates on marijuana legalization

This November 3rd, 2020, marks a potentially momentous turning point in American politics. For all voters in the United States, and expatriates abroad, the fate of their nation rests on the electoral system. That is because, as they did countless times before, the Democratic and the Republican parties will face off once more. At their helms stand candidates Joe Biden and incumbent president Donald Trump. Both politicians diverge greatly on their policies regarding immigration, healthcare and climate change. And lastly, but also just as important, is the issue of cannabis legalization.

The problem is that by enabling a bipartisan, extreme, polarized setup, voters need to fully accept the gravity of individual votes. If you liked the incumbent’s hardline anti-immigration stance, you might like the other’s expanded Obamacare plan too. So, choosing between either means thinking on the merits and demerits of each. Although, for most, that choice is overwhelmingly anti-Trump. Joe Biden, knowing his strong support amongst people of color, and the youth, plays to his base accordingly. Not surprisingly, one of his biggest plans is social equity with respect to drug-related convictions.

Both candidates bring differing viewpoints on cannabis to the table

Donald Trump, even after serving 4 years as a largely unconcerned figure in weed policies, now bears a new campaign. His party makes vague promises about relaxing marijuana import bans and restrictions. However, with no time frame nor effective plan given, there is not much to look forward to. Furthermore, the president did not go any further when it came to current legislation, which federally outlaws recreational cannabis.

Meanwhile, Biden holds a bit more promise on this front. Incorporating moderates and left-wingers into his mainstream, he seeks the approval of the newer generations. He may come from the “boomer” category, but his aides and advisors do not. His party advocates social equity for cannabis related convicts. This also aims to gain the support of affected Black and Latino communities affected by the War On Drugs. Interestingly, but also worryingly, Biden speaks extensively of decriminalizing, but not legalizing, weed. That means he is not pro-cannabis regulation, just expecting users to manage their own sources. However, as many detractors quickly point out, Biden himself signed off on the disastrous 1994 bill against drug offenders.

Experts predict that this potential shift in attitude could mean growth for the cannabis industry

As the COVID-19 pandemic is here to stay, at least for some time more, economic strains become increasingly apparent. Over 8 months of social distancing rules and safety precautions leave their mark everywhere. Public gathering places were closed for months on end, and airlines went bankrupt due to travel bans. One of the few growing industries during the time of self-quarantine was the recreational cannabis industry.

Even now, as election day fast approaches, politicians seem to gravitate in from both sides. They all know, after all, that the secret to winning public sympathy may lie in cannabis culture. That is evidenced from Biden’s Vice President, Kamala Harris, and her assurances that she would work for federal legalization. Either way, the winning candidates will need to prove their claims.

Increasing numbers of states head towards cannabis legalization, signaling an inevitable federal decision

As more and more states, from the traditionally conservative to the progressive, embrace legal cannabis, speculations abound. Most of these concern the near future, on a national scale. Will cannabis ever reach federal legalization, in the vein of gay marriage in 2015? Only time will tell.

 

 

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Economists Discuss The Fiscal Outcomes Of Cannabis Legalization

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Marijuana costs and benefits

Canada has long been a sort of reference point for how marijuana laws should be drafted and enforced. The country made cannabis legal federally back in 2018 with it’s Cannabis Act of June. That was a huge step forward then and showed that Canada was a lot further along the road to drug regulation than its neighbor. And even two years after that momentous occasion, the effects are still being studied. What kind of economic expectations should we keep, now that one of the most widely purchased black market commodities was easily available at a number of stores? Well, the answer isn’t as straightforward as you might think.

You might expect that under federal control, the industry would thrive. Being a legal drug with a huge market share means government subsidies, bailouts, tax cuts, and even more perks. So what’s the huge fuss? Let’s chalk it up as a win win scenario and call it a day, right? We wish we could, but the matter becomes a little more complicated. Because now, instead of simple transactions between dealer and consumer, cannabis has to go through the proper channels. And every person wants a slice of the pie at each level in the system. That means overhead costs go up, and then what exactly? To help explain it we’ve come up with a summary of the findings by two Canadian economists, and we’ll try to evaluate their thesis in the end.

 

Simply put, illegal is cheaper

 

As we mentioned earlier, when a commodity is obtained through a channel that isn’t regulated by the government, it has to pass through fewer barriers. Things like import tax, quantity size restrictions, and delays due to shipping companies’ mismanagement don’t apply when drugs are smuggled illegally. That isn’t good, of course. Smuggling leads to multiple socio-economic problems for a country. But what it ensures is the overall cost is low.

So if a drug dealer in Canada wants to sell cannabis, after they receive the drug from their sources, they can charge as much as they like. In order to stay competitive, though, they will try to keep a stable price. Because they only need to make a profit for themselves, that price could be just a few cents higher than what they bought it for. Contrast that to a company, which can have hundreds of employees that each need to be paid from the profit of the same amount of cannabis. The fact is, there are more mouths to feed when you go through the right channels. That means the sale price needs to be higher.

 

Two Canadian economists warn against the dangers of federal control over marijuana and other drugs

 

Ian Irvine and Miles Light talk about how more government control can mean higher costs of a drug, which in turn can lead to less sales. The market for cannabis is in direct competition with the alcohol and cigarette industries. Studies show that when weed gets harder or more expensive to buy than alcohol, most people turn to alcohol instead. The niche for marijuana is unstable, and governments adding to that instability can only do worse.

 

Taxes on marijuana will likely reduce the industry’s profits

 

The issue is, the more taxation cannabis producers and distributors have to put up with, the less they’ll sell. So indirectly, governments trying to get a share in the weed business can ruin things for everyone. The two experts published their dissertation in one of the foremost economic journals of Canada, the University of Toronto Press. So it can’t really be said whether things will turn out this way or not, but it is important to temper our expectations by keeping this in mind.

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